Episodes 124-130

Episode #124: Jesse Lubinsky

Episode #124: Jesse Lubinsky (podbean.comJesse Lubinsky

Jesse is currently the Chief Learning Officer for Ready Learner One LLC. He is an education technologist, teacher, certified school administrator, and doctoral student based out of Westchester County in New York. Prior to entering the learning space, he was a technology consultant for Fortune 500 companies specializing in network engineering and software development projects.  Jesse is co-author of Reality Bytes: Innovative Learning Using Augmented and Virtual Reality and The Esports Education Playbook: Empowering Every Learner Through Inclusive Gaming. He has also been published in the books The Chromebook Infused Classroom, 100 No-Nonsense Things that ALL Teachers Should STOP Doing, High-Tech Teaching Success! A Step by Step Guide to Using Innovative Technology in Your Classroom and Fueled by Coffee and Love: A Brew Perspective

In 2021, Jesse was named to EdTech Magazine’s Dean’s List of Higher Education IT Influencers. Previously, he was named one of BestCollegeRankings.org’s 100 Top Experts in #eLearning and #EdTech as well as a Top 100 K12 Tech Leader and Top 100 Most Social CIO by Extreme Networks. He has received a Technology Leader Pioneer Award from the Lower Hudson Regional Information Center. A Google for Education Certified Innovator and Trainer,  Jesse is also co-founder of NY TECH ED, an organization centered around instructional technology use, and a former co-chair of NYTEN, a regional group focused on technology leadership.

He is a CoSN Certified Education Technology Leader, an Adjunct Professor of Teacher Education at Ramapo College, an Adjunct Professor of Education Technology at Pace University, a member of the Google Earth Education Experts team, and a frequent keynote speaker and presenter who has recently done educational technology presentations across North America, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, and Australia. He also has a Bacon Number of 3. Jesse is co-host of the Partial Credit Podcast and the Ready Learner One Lounge, a virtual reality show focused on innovations in teaching and learning.

Trench story: In NY they had recently started school as of recording (Sept. 2021). He talked about when he was tech director, beg. of teaching career. Did NYC teaching fellows program. He teaches undergrad teachers. You can’t meet the needs of 32 individual students. He tells teachers not to set a high bar for themselves, or they will turn out burnt out. You learn those over time. He learned coping mechanisms. We say it’s about self-care but t’s have a lot of mandates. It’s a heavy load, They need to equip themselves with ways to manage themselves. Which one is it? 

#100Stop Series book he wrote that teachers need to stop feeling stupid/being afraid. We experienced the “do as I say, not as I do” attitude from teachers earlier in our careers. The stories are all such personal takes from each author. Educators are all bringing passion. For leaders, he wrote leaders need to stop forgetting where they came from. He wrote about being a chef at a top rated restaurant. we often perpetuate the weird ladder of getting to admin. So many admin forget what it’s like to fall off the rails.  Great teachers can become good admin. Some admin are so buried in admin work they forget to recognize challenges teachers have. Some leaders have no idea what they’re looking for in terms of effective instructional tech. 

We talk about Ready Learner One LLC.- Co-founded with colleagues. Wrote Reality Bites and then it became a company. We talk about http://changemakeredu.org lessons we can take away from pandemic. Reimagining prof learning.  What are we trying to do to help schools implement technologies. Partnership w/ Madison Institute. Changemaker.org free conference the past 2 summers. Democratize PD. We’re trying to provide high quality PD to micro credential. Not just doing tech, but SEL, equity work, work with a school counselor. Are there benefits that didn’t exist before the pandemic? They have different models they offer districts, whether it’s custom PD they offer to districts. Pairing offerings w/ what they already offer internally for staff. Diff states have diff requirements for PD offerings. Working at state level to find out how many Continuing Ed hours they ne

Tell me about your Doctorate work? he is doing dissertation work in micro credentialing. Got Peliton at onset of pandemic. Earned digital badges. We need to apply that thinking to how we look at PD. WE want to know what people’s expertise is, what they can bring to the table. It makes t’s more marketable. It helps people feel like they can focus on things they’re passionate about.

What has Ready Learner One done with Esports VR/AR? When he finally got to dive into it, he really understand. AR is using snapchat filters. VR is more w/ the headset. Not as many people have exposure to it. They created ABC framework, aligned different AR/VR experiences from teachers who have used it in the cr. When his book came out is when the pandemic started. They had a book tour and was taking headset w/ them.  They are still doing a lot of work in VR space. Look up Anne Frank house experience in VR world. Another one “Becoming Homeless”. It’s a thought-provoking technology. You can also create content in thin air. Print out using 3D printer. AR will have more impact in the classroom than VR, he says.  For example, he went to Black Wall St. in Tulsa, Downloaded app to phone, saw theater to see where it stood before it burned down. I asked about headsets and funding for schools. Used to be $2000 but now it’s more around $200. Most oculus headsets are recommended for 13+- There is research on effect for use from children. Companies need to make more of a commitment to edu space. Krimera is one product allowing school to happen like in person when they’re virtual. 

Professional speaking: He is signed up to present at FETC in January. He was supposed to be featured speaker at Itech in Iowa will be in April. Will go to Iceland in Nov.  and run a workshop for educators will go to ISTE. Helps educators reimagine what they can do in their CR using these technologies. There is a shift of what teachers are capable of using tech. 

Key quotes: Don’t put burden of everyone on yourself. Employ self-care. Whether it’s additional PD or no learning at all. We’re so driven by our students and work we want to do.

Find Jesse online: via his website: https://www.jesselubinsky.com/ and follow him on Twitter & IG: @jlubinsky or @ReadyLearner_1

View this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/c8Ep8364h8w

Episode #125: Suzanne DeMallie

Episode #125: Suzanne DeMallie (podbean.com)

Suzanne DeMallie

Suzanne DeMallie is the author of “Can You Hear Me Now?”. She is a speaker, former math teacher and founder of a non-profit organization. Suzanne was an ordinary CPA and mother of three prior to 2005. That’s when she was told that her son had an auditory processing disorder, and she began researching information to learn more about his diagnosis and how she could help him. But what she uncovered was a much greater problem that impacted every student in the typical classroom. She learned that all students could miss as much as third of what their teacher said due to poor classroom acoustics and immature neurological hearing abilities; and yet, there was a simple cost-effective solution – give a teacher a wireless microphone and put speakers in the classroom. As the author of a best-selling book, Can You Hear Me Now? Suzanne honestly addresses the problems in education that leave so many children behind. She vividly describes the difference between the intent of education policies and reality of putting them into practice in a classroom. She encourages parents and educators to ‘join the conversation’ to generate improvements in our public education system, and she guides them through the process using her own successful experience. Suzanne believes that if we don’t improve public education, eventually the only children left in the system will be those who had no other choice. She wants public education to be a ‘better choice’ for ALL students. Suzanne could have just fought to get this technology into her son’s classroom, but she was determined to bring this information to the attention of parents, teachers, and education decision makers nationwide. After her first presentation to just twenty people in a little school library, she was told, “I don’t want to discourage you, but…” Suzanne was warned that the public system bureaucracy was likely to prevent or at least delay schools integrating the technology for many years. But that didn’t stop Suzanne. Within ten months of starting a campaign in her district, her school system proposed putting $400,000 in their school budget to start wiring the classrooms for sound.  

Suzanne could have ended the battle right there, but she didn’t. She had seen first-hand the impact that the inability to hear or understand what you hear can have on a child. She believed that all children deserved the opportunity to hear their teacher regardless of where they were seated in the classroom. As Suzanne said, “Every child deserves a front-row seat.” She formed a non-profit organization, wrote articles, gave speeches and workshops and by July 2007, she gained the support of nearly six million PTA members when she authored a resolution that they ratified.  

By 2009, after four years of fighting this battle – one that resulted in many students throughout the US benefitting from this technology –  she decided to stop. But not to go back to her former life. Suzanne wanted to make a difference in education on a more personal level. She went back to school, got a master’s degree, and became a teacher in the Baltimore County Public School system. That’s when she saw problems in education from a very different perspective, from within the classroom.

Suzanne’s speeches empower listeners. They discover that anyone can create something better for others, just as she did. She provides the steps to break through barriers and examples using her own experience. She speaks specifically to virtues and attributes of leadership, calling on her audience to tap into what they already have, to “Be the leader” making her message relevant for all audiences.

Suzanne’s work has appeared in The Official Journal of The American Consortium for Equity in Education, TeachThought, Our Children Magazine, THE Journal, Towson Times, and The Baltimore Sun. She has presented at the National School Boards Association’s annual convention; to national, state, and local PTA groups and to politicians. Suzanne was awarded the National PTA Life Achievement Award in May 2007, the highest honor from the nation’s largest child advocacy organization and most recently was named a 2021 Champion of Equity by the American Consortium for Equity in Education. 

Trench story:  She has two-As a parent, Suzanne experienced her son being diagnosed with hearing impairment in Jan. 2005. Didn’t know how to pull self and son out. Crawled out of it by doing research. How it would impact learning, how she could help him. As a teacher– her first full-time year in the classroom. Felt overwhelmed. Felt pressure to conform to how principal wanted her to conduct lessons. Was rated “developing “ on an observation. Needed to try the lesson her way. Took ownership of lesson plans. It helps when she did her it way. Her first principal was very much a micro-manager. Needed to include key components and stick to the curriculum. Gained her respect- successful follow-up observation.  

We talk about her best-selling book, Can You Hear Me Now? Suzanne hadn’t been collecting research all along from 2005 until writing the book in 2019. Did research & writing during period of 6 months in 2019. The actual writing it didn’t take too long. It was 6 months of FT writing. Many people had suggested she do it. She gave a speech at William & Mary college, women in leadership brunch. Spoke about story as a mom. Talked about nationwide advocacy. Talked about what she saw as a teacher. People were crying, thought story was inspirational. Brought up student for SST who was behind in math/reading. Recommend he not be promoted to 5th grade. They did promote him b/c they said too many other students were further behind. Experience as teacher-School went from blue ribbon to Title 1 in 7 yrs. Saw a decline. Felt like  “why doesn’t someone do something?” (in 2018). She felt like she should be that someone. Response from book has been positive.  T wrote a note, gave copy to principal before spring break. 

How can teachers advocate for getting a sound system? She believes these & mics are an educational necessity. Kids can miss up to ⅓ of what the teacher is saying in the classroom. They don’t have fully developed hearing abilities until around age 15. They go through a difficult process to understand what the teacher is saying. Adults can fill in missing pieces of a word. In her book she writes about why public education is failing and needs to improve. The volume of teachers’ voice drops over distance. Background noise can be greater than volume of t voice. Roughly 15% of the teacher population has hearing impairment. Children have temporary loss from hearing impairment. She uses story as parent about how she advocated. She breaks it down into 10 steps to advocate for any type of issue. Most people don’t realize how poor the listening environment is for students. It’s easy to overlook hearing issues. They aren’t as obvious. Portable sound system is beneficial. It helps with behaviors as well. A behavior specialist said the behavior was better. You don’t have to yell, it’s a calmer atmosphere. The teacher is moving around the classroom, the kid can’t hear when they are in the other area of the cr. She could be an effective teacher with just a mic. It’s more necessary than a whiteboard. 

When did you leave the classroom? Resigned in July ‘19 and then outlined how she was going to write her book.

Note some of your professional speaking experience: Did a lot 17 years ago before became a teacher, national PTA, Natl School Board Assn. Has 1 lined up at a college in Maryland at college for teachers. Again is trying to raise awareness. As a t you feel helpless about controlling circumstances. We do have power w/in us to make changes. 

How is your son doing now? He just graduated from college. In 2005, he was in Kindergarten. School he moved into in 1st grade was a recipient of tech. As a mom, when he was diagnosed he was in a private K school at a church. He had to move into the public school system. He needed accommodations. It was a battle to have them recognize his processing issue. 17 years ago people didn’t recognize it as much.

Key quotes: Hearing is the foundation of learning. If you can’t hear, it’s gonna impact your ability to learn. This is an easy way to correct. It’s not that expensive. It’s less than the cost of a computer.

Find Suzanne online? go to her website: SuzanneDeMallie.com as it has tons of info about hearing issues, they can use as resource to advocate. 

Follow her on Twitter @SuzanneDeMallie

View this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/jCwU_m58USY

Episode #126: Chuck Moss

Episode #126: Chuck Moss (podbean.com)

Chuck Moss

Chuck Moss is the Director of Innovation & Development at Dinwiddie County Public Schools – Dinwiddie, VA; Presenter; Speaker; Chuck has 25 years of experience in education.  He has been a teacher, a coach, an assistant principal, a principal, and now a director.  His most important role is that of husband and father. 

Trenches story: when he got an admin degree got it from U in VA.. Was certain would get a position he interviewed for in district. It became a moment of self-reflection. Allowed self to get down in the dumps. Had Adolf Brown at convocation @docspeaks Amazing keynotes about bringing the person kids need in cr. He looked at it through diff eyes. needed to hear him as an admin. Reached out again to the speaker, had Dr. Brown come back again. Thought he wasted time getting an admin degree. He need to hear him through the ears of a teacher and then admin. Dr. Brown was a speaker at a conference not too long ago. Regardless of challenges that come your way, don’t be less than your best self. HE needed to reevaluate how he’d relate to students as a leader. He needed a leader to be a “superhero”. Take whatever comes your way. 

#DontBeAfraidtoBeAwesome Proud of his hashtag, he shares at conferences. When we have moments of weakness we can’t be less than aware. Those are the major things and #. Words of wisdom, bringing out the best  in you. They do a prof conference in his district, people register. Not really a convocation. IDCPS is about learning. Said this off the cuff. The quote really started to resonate with him. Diff. leaders from around the country used this hashtag in their video clips. Awesome had to do w/ the kind of leadership you put fwd. Crystalized into an idea. We as educators are w/ kids every day, we have to be awesome for them. It’s not about being conceited or arrogant. Students have to know you care about them. When he delivers the msg at conferences, it’s great to see how people react to it. He has stickers, lapel pens, key chains. Gives to everyone he met. Really about we’re quick to tell people how awesome we are and we have to remember about ourselves. Will do an online Twitter PD chat with his new teachers.

He is doing staff development for new t’s, using Your First Year book with teachers by Todd Whitaker & his daughters. 15 weeks/1 chapter a week. We have to find things that are motivating. The PD is just on twitter chat. The Whitakers have joined in. With Kids Deserve It, had Adam Welcome & Todd Nesolney on google chat. The new teachers are ½ and ½ on Twitter. Chuck does more of his learning on Twitter than elsewhere on social media.

Blogging: He has had one for a while. It’s a weekly thing. Often is directly related to school or what’s happening at the moment. Recently about a hummingbird one, he wrote in the car looking at a hummingbird. Before school started. Also moments of reflection/how to deal with other people. Deep breath moments. They were the only 2 entities sharing that experience. It’s neat when he has that moment of reflection “at this exact moment”.

Speaking/presenting: Keynotes are built on hashtags. Generally presents educators, men’s groups at church, to He used to tell about the power of social media. “tell your story or someone else will” such as E. Sheninger, H. Brewer. It’s always about perspective in terms of your school. U need to put out amazing things that are happening. Started about 5 years ago. Presents on finding the right admin job, finding the right people to an aspiring principal’s group. Also school culture. He is a big fan of J Casas. When you have something to say, say it. He’d love the opportunity to speak to listener’s groups.

Key quotes…It’s the moments of challenge, self-doubt, at your lowest. That lead us to moments of awesome! 

Find Chuck online on Twitter: @dcpsmoss  (best place)   IG: @dcpsmoss    FB: Chuck Moss

Website: https://chuckmoss72.wixsite.com/momentsofawesome – he wants to hear other’s stories about awesome moments. View this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/Wk6MqTc47tw

Episode #127: Lisa Caprelli

Episode #127: Lisa Caprelli (podbean.com)

Lisa Caprelli is a speaker, songwriter and an award-winning author of the unicorn book series, Unicorn Jazz. ™  She is an author of 17 books, and has produced music videos for kids. Lisa is the producer and director of Unicorn Jazz Presents The Thing I Do – Seasons 2, a family show on Amazon TV.  Lisa was inspired by Sesame Street and with her kids multi-media brand of Unicorn Jazz – kids can send in their own video content, music and talent to be part of the show!

 

The Thing I Do show was created at the onset of the pandemic to share happiness for children and educators. Her 26+ years in marketing and branding over 150 CEO’s led to her changing her life in 2018 to create a children’s brand, Unicorn Jazz.  Unicorn Jazz in the first book, is a shy unicorn who moves to a new land in search of new friends.  She feels like she does not belong, or that no one understands her, until she meets a new friend, Woof the Crow.  The book series offers social emotional learning components (empathy, kindness, love, belonging, believing in others, feelings and more. She lives in Huntington Beach, CA. 

Trench story: has had many over several time periods, is turning 50 this year. Children’s brand keeps her young at heart. Pandemic & changes many ppl had to go through. Was going on city tours and speaking to them assembly-style. She focused on how to bring happiness to kids. Used pandemic to create content on YouTube. Connected with lots of people on social.

 

We talk about Marketing for Edupreneurs: She wrote “Color your message” about marketing. she recommends to people about how they can either do it all or hire someone website. She used to create & design templates for different clients. It took her years to do so. 

 

What got you inspired in 2018 to create a children’s brand, Unicorn Jazz? As a child she was super shy, wished she was a singer. Didn’t know that all the previous people she worked for, working with lots of CEOs advising would help her jumpstart & reach children across the globe. She completely changed her brand overnight. “Skip a Step” is a book about imparting wisdom for young entrepreneurs. 

There are original songs for her show, so she learned how to write her own songs for TV show. She consulted with leaders/experts in the field. Came up with ideas being poetic. Once you’re a writer you can learn the skill sets from the experts. Music makes Unicorn Jazz so popular- it’s edutainment. Take a look of psychology of learning through scripts & writing. 

How was Unicorn Jazz inspired? By her own childhood. Her books are categorized as social-emotional learning books. She does virtual school visits, is doing a world tour. She does read-aloud. She has focused on what she could do during the pandemic, she didn’t do tech before the pandemic. She can highlight some of books are in Spanish, French. Feedback has been great.

 

Professional speaking: since pivot to children’s books she has spoken to high school students, draws on wisdom to share from brand. Has gone from working with college students to now having baby books/products.  Has worked with kids at all ages via sharing wisdom of nuggets she has learned throughout her life. She wants to tell people to never stop learning. Her greatest strength is writing vs speaking. She needs visuals for helping her to learn. She is constantly creating every day. She has an incredible behind her, actors, puppeteers, songwriters. She does a lot of book-give backs.

Upcoming events: She highlights the holiday donation drive  she is doing this for an orphanage in Haiti, food banks in LA. She has leaders helping her distribute to children in need. Has a new book “Helping give back” it’s a big picture book with the characters of Unicorn Jazz. Helping recycle. So many ways to help & give back.

 

Key quotes: “the opposite of being selfish is to help others”.  She started as young girl volunteering at hospital. It encourages the younger generation. What can you help with today? Give the glory back to a person in need.

Find Lisa online: www.UnicornJazz.com    Follow her on Instagram @lisacaprelli

UnicornJazz.com/Media

https://lisacaprelli.com/media-outreach/

View this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/uuL_RTdLH2U

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